Membership Donate Shop
Facebook Twitter You Tube Blog Pinterest

Pick-Click-Give

More Videos

Kenai River Sportfishing Association
224 Kenai Ave., Ste. 102
Soldotna, AK 99669
Tel: (907) 262-8588
Fax: (907) 262-8582
info@krsa.com

Member Login
eNews Signup

Document Library

Applications and Forms

Economics

Fisheries 2010

Fisheries 2011

Fisheries 2012

Fisheries 2013

Fisheries 2014

Habitat

  • 2010 Kenai River Restoration Project Assessment
    The report involved two assessments: 1) Project Status Assessment – an inventory of the extent and type of restoration work along the Kenai between the mouth and Skilak Lake, and 2) Project Effectiveness Assessment – an evaluation of a sub-sample of p

  • Kenai River Habitat Report Review - 2010
    Kenai River Habitat Report Review reviews and summarizes available information on the current state of Kenai River habitat, factors or threats affecting habitat, habitat-related programs, and an inventory of recent protection and restoration projects.

KRSA Documents

  • Committee A - KRSA BOF Booklet
    This booklet describes proposals submitted by Kenai River Sportfishing Association (KRSA) for changes in management plans to address issues of particular concern to the sport and personal use fishery community of the Kenai region and Upper Cook Inlet. Five major issues drive the agenda for the 2014 meeting of the Alaska Board of Fisheries: 1. Management of the salmon fisheries of the Upper Subdistrict of the Central District of Upper Cook Inlet during these times of low abundance of late-run king salmon. 2. Management of the commercial Drift Gillnet Fishery in a manner necessary to allow passage of enough salmon through to the Northern District of Upper Cook Inlet to achieve management objectives established for systems within that area. 3. Management of harvest of surplus Kasilof and late-run Kenai sockeye salmon that may be available as a consequence of adoption of strategies to address issues #1 and #2. 4. Providing for an orderly transition in early August from management of the Central District primarily for the commercial utilization of sockeye to management of the entire Upper Cook Inlet primarily for the sport and guided sport fisheries for coho salmon. 5. Assuring that ADFG has the appropriate management tools and direction for their use during this period of low abundance of early-run king salmon in the Kenai River. To address these issues, KRSA proposes: A. Prioritizing achievement of the lower end of escapement goals (proposal #103). B. Maintaining a precautionary optimal escapement goal (OEG) for early-run Kenai kings (proposal #188). C. Establishing a precautionary OEG for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #207). D. Adopting paired prescriptive restrictions in sport, personal use and commercial fisheries to share the conservation burden for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #209). E. Providing ADFG with authority to regulate set net gear for management flexibility during periods of low king abundance (proposal #211). F. Incorporating additional king protection measures in the Kasilof set net fishery (proposal #156). G. Rolling back expansion of commercial fishing power due to permit stacking (proposal #126). H. Clarifying priorities of in-river goals and OEGs for late-run Kenai sockeye (proposal #161). I. Increasing sport bag limits on surplus Kenai sockeye returns runs (proposal #168). J. Correcting Kasilof sockeye triggers for changes in sonar counting currency (proposal #112). K. Restoring Kenai coho bag limits to three during August (proposal 248).

  • Committee BCDE - KRSA BOF Booklet
    This booklet describes proposals submitted by Kenai River Sportfishing Association (KRSA) for changes in management plans to address issues of particular concern to the sport and personal use fishery community of the Kenai region and Upper Cook Inlet. Five major issues drive the agenda for the 2014 meeting of the Alaska Board of Fisheries: 1. Management of the salmon fisheries of the Upper Subdistrict of the Central District of Upper Cook Inlet during these times of low abundance of late-run king salmon. 2. Management of the commercial Drift Gillnet Fishery in a manner necessary to allow passage of enough salmon through to the Northern District of Upper Cook Inlet to achieve management objectives established for systems within that area. 3. Management of harvest of surplus Kasilof and late-run Kenai sockeye salmon that may be available as a consequence of adoption of strategies to address issues #1 and #2. 4. Providing for an orderly transition in early August from management of the Central District primarily for the commercial utilization of sockeye to management of the entire Upper Cook Inlet primarily for the sport and guided sport fisheries for coho salmon. 5. Assuring that ADFG has the appropriate management tools and direction for their use during this period of low abundance of early-run king salmon in the Kenai River. To address these issues, KRSA proposes: A. Prioritizing achievement of the lower end of escapement goals (proposal #103). B. Maintaining a precautionary optimal escapement goal (OEG) for early-run Kenai kings (proposal #188). C. Establishing a precautionary OEG for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #207). D. Adopting paired prescriptive restrictions in sport, personal use and commercial fisheries to share the conservation burden for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #209). E. Providing ADFG with authority to regulate set net gear for management flexibility during periods of low king abundance (proposal #211). F. Incorporating additional king protection measures in the Kasilof set net fishery (proposal #156). G. Rolling back expansion of commercial fishing power due to permit stacking (proposal #126). H. Clarifying priorities of in-river goals and OEGs for late-run Kenai sockeye (proposal #161). I. Increasing sport bag limits on surplus Kenai sockeye returns runs (proposal #168). J. Correcting Kasilof sockeye triggers for changes in sonar counting currency (proposal #112). K. Restoring Kenai coho bag limits to three during August (proposal 248).

  • Group 1 - KRSA BOF Booklet
    This booklet describes proposals submitted by Kenai River Sportfishing Association (KRSA) for changes in management plans to address issues of particular concern to the sport and personal use fishery community of the Kenai region and Upper Cook Inlet. Five major issues drive the agenda for the 2014 meeting of the Alaska Board of Fisheries: 1. Management of the salmon fisheries of the Upper Subdistrict of the Central District of Upper Cook Inlet during these times of low abundance of late-run king salmon. 2. Management of the commercial Drift Gillnet Fishery in a manner necessary to allow passage of enough salmon through to the Northern District of Upper Cook Inlet to achieve management objectives established for systems within that area. 3. Management of harvest of surplus Kasilof and late-run Kenai sockeye salmon that may be available as a consequence of adoption of strategies to address issues #1 and #2. 4. Providing for an orderly transition in early August from management of the Central District primarily for the commercial utilization of sockeye to management of the entire Upper Cook Inlet primarily for the sport and guided sport fisheries for coho salmon. 5. Assuring that ADFG has the appropriate management tools and direction for their use during this period of low abundance of early-run king salmon in the Kenai River. To address these issues, KRSA proposes: A. Prioritizing achievement of the lower end of escapement goals (proposal #103). B. Maintaining a precautionary optimal escapement goal (OEG) for early-run Kenai kings (proposal #188). C. Establishing a precautionary OEG for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #207). D. Adopting paired prescriptive restrictions in sport, personal use and commercial fisheries to share the conservation burden for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #209). E. Providing ADFG with authority to regulate set net gear for management flexibility during periods of low king abundance (proposal #211). F. Incorporating additional king protection measures in the Kasilof set net fishery (proposal #156). G. Rolling back expansion of commercial fishing power due to permit stacking (proposal #126). H. Clarifying priorities of in-river goals and OEGs for late-run Kenai sockeye (proposal #161). I. Increasing sport bag limits on surplus Kenai sockeye returns runs (proposal #168). J. Correcting Kasilof sockeye triggers for changes in sonar counting currency (proposal #112). K. Restoring Kenai coho bag limits to three during August (proposal 248).

  • Group 2 - KRSA BOF Booklet
    This booklet describes proposals submitted by Kenai River Sportfishing Association (KRSA) for changes in management plans to address issues of particular concern to the sport and personal use fishery community of the Kenai region and Upper Cook Inlet. Five major issues drive the agenda for the 2014 meeting of the Alaska Board of Fisheries: 1. Management of the salmon fisheries of the Upper Subdistrict of the Central District of Upper Cook Inlet during these times of low abundance of late-run king salmon. 2. Management of the commercial Drift Gillnet Fishery in a manner necessary to allow passage of enough salmon through to the Northern District of Upper Cook Inlet to achieve management objectives established for systems within that area. 3. Management of harvest of surplus Kasilof and late-run Kenai sockeye salmon that may be available as a consequence of adoption of strategies to address issues #1 and #2. 4. Providing for an orderly transition in early August from management of the Central District primarily for the commercial utilization of sockeye to management of the entire Upper Cook Inlet primarily for the sport and guided sport fisheries for coho salmon. 5. Assuring that ADFG has the appropriate management tools and direction for their use during this period of low abundance of early-run king salmon in the Kenai River. To address these issues, KRSA proposes: A. Prioritizing achievement of the lower end of escapement goals (proposal #103). B. Maintaining a precautionary optimal escapement goal (OEG) for early-run Kenai kings (proposal #188). C. Establishing a precautionary OEG for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #207). D. Adopting paired prescriptive restrictions in sport, personal use and commercial fisheries to share the conservation burden for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #209). E. Providing ADFG with authority to regulate set net gear for management flexibility during periods of low king abundance (proposal #211). F. Incorporating additional king protection measures in the Kasilof set net fishery (proposal #156). G. Rolling back expansion of commercial fishing power due to permit stacking (proposal #126). H. Clarifying priorities of in-river goals and OEGs for late-run Kenai sockeye (proposal #161). I. Increasing sport bag limits on surplus Kenai sockeye returns runs (proposal #168). J. Correcting Kasilof sockeye triggers for changes in sonar counting currency (proposal #112). K. Restoring Kenai coho bag limits to three during August (proposal 248).

  • Group 3 - KRSA BOF Booklet
    This booklet describes proposals submitted by Kenai River Sportfishing Association (KRSA) for changes in management plans to address issues of particular concern to the sport and personal use fishery community of the Kenai region and Upper Cook Inlet. Five major issues drive the agenda for the 2014 meeting of the Alaska Board of Fisheries: 1. Management of the salmon fisheries of the Upper Subdistrict of the Central District of Upper Cook Inlet during these times of low abundance of late-run king salmon. 2. Management of the commercial Drift Gillnet Fishery in a manner necessary to allow passage of enough salmon through to the Northern District of Upper Cook Inlet to achieve management objectives established for systems within that area. 3. Management of harvest of surplus Kasilof and late-run Kenai sockeye salmon that may be available as a consequence of adoption of strategies to address issues #1 and #2. 4. Providing for an orderly transition in early August from management of the Central District primarily for the commercial utilization of sockeye to management of the entire Upper Cook Inlet primarily for the sport and guided sport fisheries for coho salmon. 5. Assuring that ADFG has the appropriate management tools and direction for their use during this period of low abundance of early-run king salmon in the Kenai River. To address these issues, KRSA proposes: A. Prioritizing achievement of the lower end of escapement goals (proposal #103). B. Maintaining a precautionary optimal escapement goal (OEG) for early-run Kenai kings (proposal #188). C. Establishing a precautionary OEG for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #207). D. Adopting paired prescriptive restrictions in sport, personal use and commercial fisheries to share the conservation burden for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #209). E. Providing ADFG with authority to regulate set net gear for management flexibility during periods of low king abundance (proposal #211). F. Incorporating additional king protection measures in the Kasilof set net fishery (proposal #156). G. Rolling back expansion of commercial fishing power due to permit stacking (proposal #126). H. Clarifying priorities of in-river goals and OEGs for late-run Kenai sockeye (proposal #161). I. Increasing sport bag limits on surplus Kenai sockeye returns runs (proposal #168). J. Correcting Kasilof sockeye triggers for changes in sonar counting currency (proposal #112). K. Restoring Kenai coho bag limits to three during August (proposal 248).

  • Group 4 - KRSA BOF Booklet
    This booklet describes proposals submitted by Kenai River Sportfishing Association (KRSA) for changes in management plans to address issues of particular concern to the sport and personal use fishery community of the Kenai region and Upper Cook Inlet. Five major issues drive the agenda for the 2014 meeting of the Alaska Board of Fisheries: 1. Management of the salmon fisheries of the Upper Subdistrict of the Central District of Upper Cook Inlet during these times of low abundance of late-run king salmon. 2. Management of the commercial Drift Gillnet Fishery in a manner necessary to allow passage of enough salmon through to the Northern District of Upper Cook Inlet to achieve management objectives established for systems within that area. 3. Management of harvest of surplus Kasilof and late-run Kenai sockeye salmon that may be available as a consequence of adoption of strategies to address issues #1 and #2. 4. Providing for an orderly transition in early August from management of the Central District primarily for the commercial utilization of sockeye to management of the entire Upper Cook Inlet primarily for the sport and guided sport fisheries for coho salmon. 5. Assuring that ADFG has the appropriate management tools and direction for their use during this period of low abundance of early-run king salmon in the Kenai River. To address these issues, KRSA proposes: A. Prioritizing achievement of the lower end of escapement goals (proposal #103). B. Maintaining a precautionary optimal escapement goal (OEG) for early-run Kenai kings (proposal #188). C. Establishing a precautionary OEG for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #207). D. Adopting paired prescriptive restrictions in sport, personal use and commercial fisheries to share the conservation burden for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #209). E. Providing ADFG with authority to regulate set net gear for management flexibility during periods of low king abundance (proposal #211). F. Incorporating additional king protection measures in the Kasilof set net fishery (proposal #156). G. Rolling back expansion of commercial fishing power due to permit stacking (proposal #126). H. Clarifying priorities of in-river goals and OEGs for late-run Kenai sockeye (proposal #161). I. Increasing sport bag limits on surplus Kenai sockeye returns runs (proposal #168). J. Correcting Kasilof sockeye triggers for changes in sonar counting currency (proposal #112). K. Restoring Kenai coho bag limits to three during August (proposal 248).

  • Group 5 - KRSA BOF Booklet
    This booklet describes proposals submitted by Kenai River Sportfishing Association (KRSA) for changes in management plans to address issues of particular concern to the sport and personal use fishery community of the Kenai region and Upper Cook Inlet. Five major issues drive the agenda for the 2014 meeting of the Alaska Board of Fisheries: 1. Management of the salmon fisheries of the Upper Subdistrict of the Central District of Upper Cook Inlet during these times of low abundance of late-run king salmon. 2. Management of the commercial Drift Gillnet Fishery in a manner necessary to allow passage of enough salmon through to the Northern District of Upper Cook Inlet to achieve management objectives established for systems within that area. 3. Management of harvest of surplus Kasilof and late-run Kenai sockeye salmon that may be available as a consequence of adoption of strategies to address issues #1 and #2. 4. Providing for an orderly transition in early August from management of the Central District primarily for the commercial utilization of sockeye to management of the entire Upper Cook Inlet primarily for the sport and guided sport fisheries for coho salmon. 5. Assuring that ADFG has the appropriate management tools and direction for their use during this period of low abundance of early-run king salmon in the Kenai River. To address these issues, KRSA proposes: A. Prioritizing achievement of the lower end of escapement goals (proposal #103). B. Maintaining a precautionary optimal escapement goal (OEG) for early-run Kenai kings (proposal #188). C. Establishing a precautionary OEG for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #207). D. Adopting paired prescriptive restrictions in sport, personal use and commercial fisheries to share the conservation burden for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #209). E. Providing ADFG with authority to regulate set net gear for management flexibility during periods of low king abundance (proposal #211). F. Incorporating additional king protection measures in the Kasilof set net fishery (proposal #156). G. Rolling back expansion of commercial fishing power due to permit stacking (proposal #126). H. Clarifying priorities of in-river goals and OEGs for late-run Kenai sockeye (proposal #161). I. Increasing sport bag limits on surplus Kenai sockeye returns runs (proposal #168). J. Correcting Kasilof sockeye triggers for changes in sonar counting currency (proposal #112). K. Restoring Kenai coho bag limits to three during August (proposal 248).

  • Group 6 - KRSA BOF Booklet
    This booklet describes proposals submitted by Kenai River Sportfishing Association (KRSA) for changes in management plans to address issues of particular concern to the sport and personal use fishery community of the Kenai region and Upper Cook Inlet. Five major issues drive the agenda for the 2014 meeting of the Alaska Board of Fisheries: 1. Management of the salmon fisheries of the Upper Subdistrict of the Central District of Upper Cook Inlet during these times of low abundance of late-run king salmon. 2. Management of the commercial Drift Gillnet Fishery in a manner necessary to allow passage of enough salmon through to the Northern District of Upper Cook Inlet to achieve management objectives established for systems within that area. 3. Management of harvest of surplus Kasilof and late-run Kenai sockeye salmon that may be available as a consequence of adoption of strategies to address issues #1 and #2. 4. Providing for an orderly transition in early August from management of the Central District primarily for the commercial utilization of sockeye to management of the entire Upper Cook Inlet primarily for the sport and guided sport fisheries for coho salmon. 5. Assuring that ADFG has the appropriate management tools and direction for their use during this period of low abundance of early-run king salmon in the Kenai River. To address these issues, KRSA proposes: A. Prioritizing achievement of the lower end of escapement goals (proposal #103). B. Maintaining a precautionary optimal escapement goal (OEG) for early-run Kenai kings (proposal #188). C. Establishing a precautionary OEG for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #207). D. Adopting paired prescriptive restrictions in sport, personal use and commercial fisheries to share the conservation burden for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #209). E. Providing ADFG with authority to regulate set net gear for management flexibility during periods of low king abundance (proposal #211). F. Incorporating additional king protection measures in the Kasilof set net fishery (proposal #156). G. Rolling back expansion of commercial fishing power due to permit stacking (proposal #126). H. Clarifying priorities of in-river goals and OEGs for late-run Kenai sockeye (proposal #161). I. Increasing sport bag limits on surplus Kenai sockeye returns runs (proposal #168). J. Correcting Kasilof sockeye triggers for changes in sonar counting currency (proposal #112). K. Restoring Kenai coho bag limits to three during August (proposal 248).

  • Introduction - KRSA BOF Booklet
    This booklet describes proposals submitted by Kenai River Sportfishing Association (KRSA) for changes in management plans to address issues of particular concern to the sport and personal use fishery community of the Kenai region and Upper Cook Inlet. Five major issues drive the agenda for the 2014 meeting of the Alaska Board of Fisheries: 1. Management of the salmon fisheries of the Upper Subdistrict of the Central District of Upper Cook Inlet during these times of low abundance of late-run king salmon. 2. Management of the commercial Drift Gillnet Fishery in a manner necessary to allow passage of enough salmon through to the Northern District of Upper Cook Inlet to achieve management objectives established for systems within that area. 3. Management of harvest of surplus Kasilof and late-run Kenai sockeye salmon that may be available as a consequence of adoption of strategies to address issues #1 and #2. 4. Providing for an orderly transition in early August from management of the Central District primarily for the commercial utilization of sockeye to management of the entire Upper Cook Inlet primarily for the sport and guided sport fisheries for coho salmon. 5. Assuring that ADFG has the appropriate management tools and direction for their use during this period of low abundance of early-run king salmon in the Kenai River. To address these issues, KRSA proposes: A. Prioritizing achievement of the lower end of escapement goals (proposal #103). B. Maintaining a precautionary optimal escapement goal (OEG) for early-run Kenai kings (proposal #188). C. Establishing a precautionary OEG for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #207). D. Adopting paired prescriptive restrictions in sport, personal use and commercial fisheries to share the conservation burden for late-run Kenai kings (proposal #209). E. Providing ADFG with authority to regulate set net gear for management flexibility during periods of low king abundance (proposal #211). F. Incorporating additional king protection measures in the Kasilof set net fishery (proposal #156). G. Rolling back expansion of commercial fishing power due to permit stacking (proposal #126). H. Clarifying priorities of in-river goals and OEGs for late-run Kenai sockeye (proposal #161). I. Increasing sport bag limits on surplus Kenai sockeye returns runs (proposal #168). J. Correcting Kasilof sockeye triggers for changes in sonar counting currency (proposal #112). K. Restoring Kenai coho bag limits to three during August (proposal 248).

  • Kenai River Spring Cleanup

  • Membership Application (PDF file) to Download
    To become a member and join the effort to protect the greatest sportsfishing river in the world, download and fill out this PDF form. Send us your completed form to jen@krsa.com or FA

  • Release a Hog - Take Home a Trophy Program
    2012 Release a Hog Rules & Application

News